Global Advisory Panel on Corporate Governance and Risk Management of Blood Services in Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

Tools

Template: Sample Memorandum of Understanding (for customising)
MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING between The Ministry of Health and [NS - insert name] The use of this Case Study Template Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), and all associated documents referenced within, is at the user's own risk and the Global Advisory Panel (GAP) on Corporate Governance and Risk Management of Blood Services in Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies disclaims any liability for its use. It is at the user's sole discretion to implement a more or less stringent procedure, subject to the user's own operational context and requirements, and it is strongly advised that comprehensive stakeholder collaboration between parties is conducted to verify the document is relevant and effective for local processes. In providing a copy of this example MOU, and all associated documents referenced within, GAP does not undertake to provide updates nor warrant its fitness for any purpose other than as a representation / sample of an operational agreement undertaken within the National Society's operational context. GAP disclaims any liability arising out of the use of the MOU, and all associated documents referenced within, or any document derived from this MOU. General This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) expresses the understanding and intentions of the [insert name] (hereafter referred to as NS name) and the Ministry of Health (hereafter referred as insert name / MOH) concerning the responsibilities and contributions of both parties in regard to the Blood Donor Recruitment component of the National Blood Transfusion Program. Background The [NS name] is guided by the Seven Principles of the International Red Cross Red Crescent Movement and aims to assist the most vulnerable people (in this case those needing transfusion) within the country. It is acknowledged that the [NS name] is in a position within the community to mobilize voluntary non-remunerated blood donors. In ( Year ) the [NS name] was established by an Act of Parliament and the Government of Red cross recognised the [NS name] as an auxiliary to public authorities and is accordingly fully indemnified by the Red cross Government. Purpose The overall purpose of [NS name] engaging in blood donor recruitment and advocacy activities is to assist the [name / MOH] to improve blood adequacy and safety within the National Blood Transfusion Program. In partnership with the [name/MOH], [NS name] aims to increase the number of voluntary non-remunerated blood donors and therefore the number of safe blood units in stock. Contributions and Responsibilities The [NS name] will undertake a Blood Donor Recruitment Program to assist the [name / MOH] improve blood safety within the National Blood Transfusion Program. [NS name] will consult on a continuous basis with the [name / MOH] regarding the National Blood Transfusion Program however, [NS name] will only engage in activities relating to blood donor recruitment. Blood donor recruitment does not involve any aspects of bleeding, testing, transfusion or any other technical components of the National Blood Transfusion Program. Thus, [NS name] shall not be held responsible for any error or omission which should occur through the implementation of these practices. The [name / MOH] will work together with [NS name] to establish an effective and thorough pre and post donation counselling system for donors their families. 4.1 Contribution and Responsibilities of the [NS name] 4.1.1 Support and consistently engage with the [name / MOH] to carry out blood donor recruitment activities 4.1.2 Develop a blood donor recruitment plan and database 4.1.3 Educate the community about the importance of voluntary blood donation 4.1.4 Conduct community awareness campaigns utilizing appropriate and affordable media 4.1.5 Utilize community network to facilitate recruiting when required 4.1.6 Establish and implement a donor motivation scheme to encourage donor retention 4.1.7 Assist with donor care eg.serve refreshment provided by the [name / MOH], as well as pre and post counselling 4.1.8 Support the Blood Bank and Health Partners in the implementation of research 4.1.9 Facilitate appropriate training and sharing of resources and lessons learned amongst other partners and agencies in the Region where supported by the IFRC or sister National Societies. 4.1.10 Provide narrative and financial reports to Donor agencies 4.2Contribution and Responsibilities of the [name / MOH] 4.2.1 To take responsibility for the National Blood Transfusion Program and specifically to undertake all technical aspects of the Program including bleeding, testing, follow up and transfusion 4.2.2 To continue to implement, maintain and review confidential blood donor records 4.2.3 To provide blood donation facilities and infrastructure as necessary and appropriate 4.2.4 To support Laboratory staff to participate in blood donor recruitment activities and to work in partnership with the [NS name] 4.2.5 Assist the [NS name]in the development of IEC (Information, Education and Communication) and promotional materials, and in running media campaigns 4.2.6 To provide transport for blood donors to and from the Blood Bank 4.2.7 To conduct pre and post counselling for donors and their families 4.2.8 To provide refreshments for blood donors 4.2.9 To provide the [name] and Laboratory staff who engage in the blood transfusion program on-going training opportunities as appropriate Mutual Understanding of Both Parties Both parties understand that voluntary blood donor recruitment will be improved by the [NS name] and the [name / MOH] working together towards this same purpose. Both parties agree to work together in an open and consultative manner. Arbitration Should any disagreement arise on the part of either the [NS name] or the [name / MOH], the National Blood Transfusion Committee should negotiate with both parties and try to resolve the problem. Review and Evaluation The [NS name] and the [name / MOH] will work together to review the blood donor recruitment activities in one year from the date of signing this MOU. At this time both parties will discuss the need for resources including funding and potential strategies for the continuation of the agreement. It is the intention of both parties that this agreement will be ongoing. A thorough evaluation of the agreement may be undertaken in two years from the date of signing this MOU subject to the funding of the review at this time. The [Ns name] and the [name / MOH] will cooperate wherever necessary to ensure that true and accurate information is available for the purpose of program reporting, review and evaluation. Duration This Memorandum of Understanding is valid upon signature by authorised representatives of both parties. The continuation of the MoU is subject to review by both parties 12 months after the date of signing. Once validated by signatures, this MoU supersedes all previous MoUs on these topics. Signed at ..............................in duplicate on the .................day of..................... 2018 Signed for and on behalf of the Ministry of Health of [insert] .......................................... .................................. ........................................ NameSignature Title Signed for and on behalf of the [name] Red Cross / Red Crescent National Society. Secretary General NameSignature Title
Guideline: Branding
MARKETING MATERIALSFor Information, Communication & Education (IEC)Branding GuidelinesP u r p o s e : This tools serves as a guide only, all templates can be edited (for example. content,colours, fonts, images) at the discretion of each National Society Blood Program2018Fonts can be found online, or please emailgapsecretariat@redcrossblood.org.au for support
Brochure Template: After Donation Care
EXAMPLE DOWNLOAD REQUIRED FONT(S): Univers LT Std 57 Cn, Univers LT 67 CondensedBold. Check information is accurate and relevant to local systems, blood service standards and operational requirements Update contact details / social media / logos Print in A4 as desired and cut to 3Before using these resources, please consider which materials are relevant and appropriate for your National Society's level of involvement in blood programs (Levels A, B or C). It is important to understand the risk management issues around appropriate use of Red Cross / Red Crescent logos and branding in government blood centres, including any reputational risks surrounding this. Note. The use of these templates, and all associated documents referenced within, is at the user's own risk and the Global Advisory Panel (GAP) on Corporate Governance and Risk Management of Blood Services in Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies disclaims any liability for its use. It is at the user's sole discretion to adapt these to a more or less stringent format, subject to the user's own operational context and requirements, and it is strongly advised that comprehensive stakeholder collaboration between parties is conducted to validate the document is relevant and effective for local processes. In providing a copy of these templates, and all associated documents referenced within, GAP does not undertake to provide updates nor warrant its fitness for any purpose other than as a representation / sample of an operational agreement undertaken within the National Society's operational context. GAP disclaims any liability arising out of the use of these documents, and all associated documents referenced within, or any document derived from these materials.Brochure: Instructions for useSize: Fit 3 to A4 at ~ 19.2 x 9.7cmPurpose: Information following blood donationUpdates required (update all yellow text): Contact gapsecretariat@redcrossblood.org.au if you require further assistance THANK YOU FOR DONATING BLOOD After you donate: Avoid smoking Stay well hydrated, avoid exercise / heavy lifting, try not to overheat (ie. hot showers, direct sun) and avoid prolonged standing . Avoid alcohol If you have any questions after donation, become unwell, or think your blood unit should not be used for any reason, please call us on [insert telephone] (all calls are confidential) . Share your experience with family, friends and on social media. Websitefacebook Logo 1 logo 2 THANK YOU FOR DONATING BLOOD After you donate: Avoid smoking Stay well hydrated, avoid exercise / heavy lifting, try not to overheat (ie. hot showers, direct sun) and avoid prolonged standing . Avoid alcohol If you have any questions after donation, become unwell, or think your blood unit should not be used for any reason, please call us on [insert telephone] (all calls are confidential) . Share your experience with family, friends and on social media. Websitefacebook Logo 1 logo 2 THANK YOU FOR DONATING BLOOD After you donate: Avoid smoking Stay well hydrated, avoid exercise / heavy lifting, try not to overheat (ie. hot showers, direct sun) and avoid prolonged standing . Avoid alcohol If you have any questions after donation, become unwell, or think your blood unit should not be used for any reason, please call us on [insert telephone] (all calls are confidential) . Share your experience with family, friends and on social media. Websitefacebook Logo 1 logo 2
Poster Template: Making Donors Safer
Insert Logo 1 hereInsert Logo 2 hereGIVING IS IN YOUR BLOODWHO CAN GIVE BLOOD18+ Years Old / 50+ KgA trained staff member will help determine if you are eligible to donateHOW CAN YOU HELP KEEP BLOOD SAFEPlease tell us if you have experienced:A cold, fever or flu in the last few daysA tattoo in the last 12 monthsUnsafe sexual practices (eg. unprotected sex with new partners) WORKING TOGETHER WILL HELP KEEP DONORS AND PATIENTS SAFEHOW LONG DOES THE DONATION TAKE5-15 minutesEXAMPLEPoster: Eligibility and Self-deferral Instructions for use:Size: A3 (may also be brochure size)Purpose: Intended for displaying in the blood centre to inform the donor of their donation eligibility and encourage self-deferral. Updates required (update all yellow text):Contact gapsecretariat@redcrossblood.org.au if you require further assistance.Note.The use of these templates, and all associated documents referenced within, is at the user's own risk and the Global Advisory Panel (GAP) on Corporate Governance and Risk Management of Blood Services in Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies disclaims any liability for its use. It is at the user's sole discretion to adapt these to a more or less stringent format, subject to the user's own operational context and requirements, and it is strongly advised that comprehensive stakeholder collaboration between parties is conducted to validate the document is relevant and effective for local processes. In providing a copy of these templates, and all associated documents referenced within, GAP does not undertake to provide updates nor warrant its fitness for any purpose other than as a representation / sample of an operational agreement undertaken within the National Society's operational context. GAP disclaims any liability arising out of the use of these documents, and all associated documents referenced within, or any document derived from these materials.DOWNLOAD REQUIRED FONT(S): Univers LT Std 57 Cn,Univers LT 67 CondensedBold. Insert logo(s) as requiredUpdate eligibility criteria Note: It is important to ensure this information is updated accurately based on local standards (ie. blood donor selection and donor deferral criteria / guidelines) Print in A3 or desired sizeBefore using these resources, please consider which materials are relevant and appropriate for your National Society's level of involvement in blood programs (Levels A, B or C). It is important to understand the risk management issues around appropriate use of Red Cross / Red Crescent logos and branding in government blood centres, including any reputational risks surrounding this. Insert Logo 1 hereInsert Logo 2 hereGIVING IS IN YOUR BLOODWHO CAN GIVE BLOODOver 18 years old Over 50 kgA trained staff member will help determine if you are eligible to donateHOW CAN YOU HELP KEEP BLOOD SAFEPlease tell us if you have experienced:A cold, fever or flu in the last few daysA tattoo in the last 12 monthsUnsafe sexual practices (e.g. unprotected sex with new partners) WORKING TOGETHER WILL HELP KEEP DONORS AND PATIENTS SAFEHOW LONG DOES THE DONATION TAKE5-15 minutes
Feature Template: Recipient Stories
Insert Logo 1 hereInsert Logo 2 hereInsert short recipient story here and adjust sizes as required. Do not use too many words.For example.Frank was in a serious traffic accident and would not have survived without the 4 units of blood he received. He owes his life to voluntary blood donors.Posters: Instructions for useMEET NAME.NAME NEEDED BLOOD TO SURVIVEINSERT IMAGE HERE & ADJUST Posters: Instructions for useSize: Poster / brochure / media - as desiredPurpose: General public, or for displaying in blood centreUpdates required (update all yellow text):Contact gapsecretariat@redcrossblood.org.au if you require further assistance.Posters: Recipient StoryInstructions for use:DOWNLOAD REQUIRED FONT(S): Univers LT Std 57 Cn,Univers LT 67 CondensedBold. Obtain image and story, and seek recipient's written permission to use (see guidance document "Sample Photo Release Form -Template)Insert image of recipient into slide 3, adjust accordinglyInsert logos and any other relevant information Do not insert any details that might enable the recipient to be contactedAdjust the layout of the poster if requiredPrint in desired sizeBefore using these resources, please consider which materials are relevant and appropriate for your National Society's level of involvement in blood programs (Levels A, B or C). It is important to understand the risk management issues around appropriate use of Red Cross / Red Crescent logos and branding in government blood centres, including any reputational risks surrounding this. Note.The use of these templates, and all associated documents referenced within, is at the user's own risk and the Global Advisory Panel (GAP) on Corporate Governance and Risk Management of Blood Services in Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies disclaims any liability for its use. It is at the user's sole discretion to adapt these to a more or less stringent format, subject to the user's own operational context and requirements, and it is strongly advised that comprehensive stakeholder collaboration between parties is conducted to validate the document is relevant and effective for local processes. In providing a copy of these templates, and all associated documents referenced within, GAP does not undertake to provide updates nor warrant its fitness for any purpose other than as a representation / sample of an operational agreement undertaken within the National Society's operational context. GAP disclaims any liability arising out of the use of these documents, and all associated documents referenced within, or any document derived from these materials.
Brochure Template: Donate Blood
Insert Logo 1 hereInsert Logo 2 hereWhy should I donate blood?There is no substitute for bloodBlood has a short expiry Regular donation ensures blood will be available in an emergency situation, i.e. a road traffic accidentGIVING IS IN YOUR BLOOD.DONATE TODAY. A single blood donation can save up to 3 lives.What should I expect?One blood donation of [INSERT]mL is quick and painless , and donors receive a refreshment at the end of donation. For further information call [insert telephone]#GivingIsInYourBloodYour blood will be used to save the lives of: Children and pregnant women, mothers losing blood during childbirth, road accident victims, cancer patients, major surgery, anemia and thalassemia EXAMPLEInsert Logo 1 hereInsert Logo 2 hereWhy should I donate blood?There is no substitute for bloodBlood has a short expiry Regular donation ensures blood will be available in an emergency situation, i.e. a road traffic accidentGIVING IS IN YOUR BLOOD.DONATE TODAY. A single blood donation can save up to 3 lives.What should I expect?One blood donation of [INSERT]mL is quick and painless, and donors receive a refreshment at the end of donation. For further information call [insert telephone]#GivingIsInYourBloodYour blood will be used to save the lives of: Children and pregnant women, mothers losing blood during childbirth, road accident victims, cancer patients, major surgery, anemia and thalassemia Brochure: Instructions for useSize: 9.9 x 20.1cm (or fit 3 to A4 at ~ 19.2 x 9.7cm)Purpose: General information for potential donorsUpdates required (update all yellow text):Contact gapsecretariat@redcrossblood.org.au if you require further assistanceNote.The use of these templates, and all associated documents referenced within, is at the user's own risk and the Global Advisory Panel (GAP) on Corporate Governance and Risk Management of Blood Services in Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies disclaims any liability for its use. It is at the user's sole discretion to adapt these to a more or less stringent format, subject to the user's own operational context and requirements, and it is strongly advised that comprehensive stakeholder collaboration between parties is conducted to validate the document is relevant and effective for local processes. In providing a copy of these templates, and all associated documents referenced within, GAP does not undertake to provide updates nor warrant its fitness for any purpose other than as a representation / sample of an operational agreement undertaken within the National Society's operational context. GAP disclaims any liability arising out of the use of these documents, and all associated documents referenced within, or any document derived from these materials.DOWNLOAD REQUIRED FONT(S): Univers LT Std 57 Cn,Univers LT 67 CondensedBold. Check information is accurate and relevant to local systems, blood service standards and operational requirementsConsider updating the brochure with who requires the most blood in your country (Reference: Your blood will be used to save the lives of:)Insert average blood donation volume (Reference: One blood donation of [INSERT]mL)Update contact details & add logosBefore using these resources, please consider which materials are relevant and appropriate for your National Society's level of involvement in blood programs (Levels A, B or C). It is important to understand the risk management issues around appropriate use of Red Cross / Red Crescent logos and branding in government blood centres, including any reputational risks surrounding this.
Posters Template: Donate Blood
POSTERS: GENERALBECOME A VOLUNTARYBLOOD DONOR AND SAVE LIVESGIVING IS IN YOUR BLOODDONATE NOW#GivingIsInYourBloodCall: 13 14 16 / Visit: 145 Example Roadwww.facebook.com/ExampleRedCrossBloodServiceInsert Logo 1 hereInsert Logo 2 hereEXAMPLEGIVING IS IN YOUR BLOODDONATE NOWBecome a voluntary donor and save lives#GivingIsInYourBloodInsert event / blood drive or mobile information here, for example:Blood ServicePlaceDateTimePhone | FacebookInsert Logo 1 hereInsert Logo 2 hereGIVING IS IN YOUR BLOODDONATE NOWBecome a voluntary donor and save lives#GivingIsInYourBloodInsert event / blood drive or mobile information here, for example:Blood ServicePlaceDateTimePhone | FacebookInsert Logo 1 hereInsert Logo 2 hereGIVING IS IN YOUR BLOODDONATE NOWBecome a voluntary donor and save lives#GivingIsInYourBloodBLOOD DRIVE: Forrest University21st July 20181pm - 3pm145 Example Street, Room 4ETelephone: 1300 xx xx to make an appointment www.facebook.com/ExampleRedCrossBloodServiceInsert Logo 1 hereInsert Logo 2 hereEXAMPLEPOSTERS: EVENTSGIVING IS IN YOUR BLOODDONATE NOWBecome a voluntary donor and save lives#GivingIsInYourBloodCall: xxx xxxFacebook.comInsert addressInsert Logo 1 hereInsert Logo 2 hereDID YOU KNOW? Blood has a short expiry which is why regular donation is important BECOME A VOLUNTARYBLOOD DONOR AND SAVE LIVESGIVING IS IN YOUR BLOODDONATE NOW#GivingIsInYourBloodCall: xxx xxxFacebook.comInsert addressInsert Logo 1 hereInsert Logo 2 herePosters: Instructions for useSize: As desired (A4 or A3 / other)Purpose: General information for potential donors, events / mobile / blood drive postersUpdates required (update all yellow text):Before using these resources, please consider which materials are relevant and appropriate for your National Society's level of involvement in blood programs (Levels A, B or C). It is important to understand the risk management issues around appropriate use of Red Cross / Red Crescent logos and branding in government blood centres, including any reputational risks surrounding this. Contact gapsecretariat@redcrossblood.org.au if you require further assistance.Posters: General Public and EventsInstructions for use:DOWNLOAD REQUIRED FONT(S): Univers LT Std 57 Cn,Univers LT 67 CondensedBold. Insert logo(s) as requiredUpdate contact details (ie. telephone, address, social media etc)For event posters, insert blood collection mobile / blood drive / event details (this may even be an educational event / presentation)Print in desired sizeNote.The use of these templates, and all associated documents referenced within, is at the user's own risk and the Global Advisory Panel (GAP) on Corporate Governance and Risk Management of Blood Services in Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies disclaims any liability for its use. It is at the user's sole discretion to adapt these to a more or less stringent format, subject to the user's own operational context and requirements, and it is strongly advised that comprehensive stakeholder collaboration between parties is conducted to validate the document is relevant and effective for local processes. In providing a copy of these templates, and all associated documents referenced within, GAP does not undertake to provide updates nor warrant its fitness for any purpose other than as a representation / sample of an operational agreement undertaken within the National Society's operational context. GAP disclaims any liability arising out of the use of these documents, and all associated documents referenced within, or any document derived from these materials.
Español - GAP VNRBD Newsletter - June 2018
Checklist Level B
Level B: Systematic recruitment of voluntary blood donorsSome National Societies support their domestic blood programme and blood services by recruitingblood donors and providing access to blood donation centres. These societies act in partnership with ablood service, actively promote non-remunerated donation, and motivate donors through information andrecruitment campaigns. National Societies at Level B need to enter into a dialogue with the bloodservices to which they recruit donors to ensure that the blood service has the appropriate standards indonor care and quality assurance.National SocietyVNRBDRecruitmentprogrammechecklistFundamentals Adherence to the IFRCs blood policy and the minimal conditions described inthe GAP Self-assessment (Level B). Ensuring that the blood service the National Society recruits blood donors tomeets local regulatory requirements and/or WHO and international standardsrecommended for national blood programmes (see Level A information on pages8-11). The blood donor recruitment programme is based on VNRBD. Roles and responsibilities between the National Society and government havebeen clarified and there is a documented service agreement for VNRBDrecruitment activities. A long-term and sustainable source of revenue for the donor recruitmentprogramme has been secured. The donor recruitment programme is evaluated regularly to assess whether a) itis meeting demands or b) it is grossly exceeding requirements. The donor is treated ethically and his or her privacy and confidentiality areassured. The IFRC toolkit Making a differenceRecruiting VNRBD is used.Blood donor recruitment programme management There is a clear vision, mission and strategic plan for the donor recruitmentprogramme. Performance goals and key performance indicators have been established tomonitor progress against the strategic plan. The programme is under the direction of a professional director with authorityover the necessary resources, who is part of the National Societys seniormanagement team. The director organizes, manages, trains, monitors and evaluates the staff,volunteers and procedures involved in blood donor recruitment and retention. Staff are continually trained in all aspects of blood donor recruitment andretention.Donor care and counselling A donor register and records are maintained. The National Societys donor recruitment and deferral practices reflect nationaldonor selection and deferral criteria. Counselling for donors, especially those that have been deferred, is provided by13the National Society or blood service, as appropriate. Good customer service and donor care is the responsibility of all staff members. Staff performance is subject to monitoring and evaluation.Promotion A community education programme develops positive attitudes to VNRBD. Donor populations at low risk of transfusion-transmitted infections (TTIs) aretargeted. The worth of blood donations and blood donors is recognized. The National Society works with clinicians (through education, awareness, etc.)to promote VNRBD.Sustainability There is a risk management framework in place to identify, prioritize andmanage risks relevant to the local environment. A clear disaster preparedness and contingency plan is in place.Level of RiskMedium (refer to Chapter 4, Appendix 2, and the GAP Self-assessment Level B).Key Resources Promoting Safe and Sustainable Blood Systems Policy (draft). Geneva, IFRC,2011 (see Appendix 1). GAP Self-assessment Level B. GAP, current version. Towards 100 per cent voluntary blood donation: A global framework for action.Geneva, WHO and IFRC, 2010. Making a differenceRecruiting voluntary, non-remunerated blood donors.Toolkit, Geneva, IFRC, 2008. Developing a Voluntary Blood Donor Programme for Blood Safety (DONOR).Geneva, WHO and IFRC. Aide-Mmoire: Blood Safety. Geneva, WHO, 2002. Aide-Mmoire: Safe Blood Components. Geneva, WHO, 2005. New blood for the world, DVD and leaflet. Geneva, IFRC, 2009. Proceedings of the international colloquia on the recruitment of VNRBD.Making the most of World Blood Donor Day. WHO/IFRC/FIODS/ISBT,http://www.who.int/worldblooddonorday/resources/making_the_most_of_wbdd.pdfPlease note: References relevant to the content in each manual chapter are listedunder the Resources heading found at the end of most sections.14
IFRC Blood Policy
GB/11.1/1Original: EnglishINTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF RED CROSS ANDRED CRESCENT SOCIETIES24th Session of the Governing Board,Geneva, Switzerland, 28-30 September 2011Item 11.1 of the agendaPolicy on Promoting Safe and Sustainable National Blood SystemsIt is recommended that:The Governing Board,approves the draft policy on Promoting Safe and Sustainable National BloodSystems and refers it to the upcoming General Assembly for final decisionExecutive summary.The attached version of the revised policy includes modifications to the text submitted to theGoverning Board in December 2010. More specifically there are some substance additions tothe version proposed by the Advisory Body on Health And Sustainable Development - especiallyin the list of points describing an integrated approach to blood safety (just below thedescription of Level B programmes) - and there is clarification of roles and responsibilitiesrelated to risk management at global and other levels. The key modifcations related to riskmanagement are to be found in the section on Specific Responsibilities arising out of thispolicy. In summary, it is underlined that the primary responsibility for managing safety andrisks of blood programmes lies with national governments. The remainder of the text remainslargely largely unchanged in substance over the version presented to the Governing Board inDecember last year.What is the issueThe need for a new blood policy was in part triggered by a comprehensive report submitted bythe Global Advisory Panel on Blood (GAP) on the Review of risks associated with bloodservice delivery for National Societies engaged in blood programmes to the Governing Board inSeptember 2009. While there was subsequently relatively quickly agreement on the maintechnical substance, it took a while longer to find consensus around the definition of roles andresponisbilities related to the management of the various risks associated with different forms ofengagement of the membership in blood related activities.The relation to previous governance decision(s)Following the December 2010 Governing Board decision asking the Secretariat to conductfurther consultations with National Societies on the draft blood policy as well as the April 2011decision supporting the proposal of the Secretary General to continue consultations on the bloodpolicy specifically in the area of risk management, a final draft is now presented to theGoverning Board for endorsement and for transmission to the General Assembly for finaldecision.The relation to existing policiesThis policy replaces the 1999 policy on Quality Provision of Blood ServicesThe relation to strategic objectivesRed Cross Red Crescent work on blood issues is in particular covered by strategic aim 2 ofStrategy 2020.How does this decision solve the issueThe new policy provides clarity on the scope of Red Cross Red Crescent blood related activitiesas well as roles and responsibilities related to management of associated risksResearch, analysis and consultations carried outVarious key stakeholders have been consulted, including the Advisory Body for Health and SustainableDevelopment, GAP (Global Advisory Panel on Blood), the Risk and Audit Comittee and senior managersand leaders of Natioanl Societies. In addition the Secretariat took into consideration pro bono workof a British law firm.Any other relevant information: to be refered in annexesNot applicableResource implicationsThere are at this stage no specific resource implications for the Secretariat. The membership atalrge is being constinously asked to support theRecommended optionsThe Secretariat orally updated the Governing Board at its April 2011 session on its perspectiveon possible legal liabilities and the various options of managing risk at the global level as wellas options for the future legal structure of GAP. There are separate terms of reference for GAP,and discussions and work are being carried out towards establishing GAP as a separate legalentity.Any potential risks to the FederationRed Cross and Red Crescent engagement in blood activities will always come with reputationaland other risks. Adherence to the policy will signifcantly contibute to effective management ofrisks.Implementation and Monitoring and how implementation will be monitored and reportedto the Governing BoardThe Secretariat is a member of the GAP Board, and will update the Governing Board through theSecretary General on material issues and risks that are brought to its attention in relation toimplementation of the blood policy.POLICYPromoting Safe and Sustainable National Blood SystemsIntroduction:Blood safety is a critical underpinning for safe blood transfusion and health systems. People in allcountries have a right to expect that the blood and blood products supplied to them are gathered,produced and provided in a safe and sustainable way that supports their communities and theirhealth systems.The International Federation recognises that health security is a fundamental and indispensableprerequisite to global, national and individual development1 and it supports the advancement ofglobal health security by promoting voluntary non-remunerated blood donation (VNRBD), andadvocating for the safe provision of blood and products2.While the World Health Organisation (WHO) recognises that it is the responsibility of governments toensure a safe and adequate supply of blood3, Red Cross/Red Crescent Societies in many countries,as auxiliaries to their governments, play an important role in promoting safe and sustainable bloodprogrammes. National Society activities range from the provision of the national blood service, tosystematic recruitment of voluntary blood donors, to promotion of blood donation and advocacy forVNRBD, for example annual participation in World Blood Donor Day.Scope of policyThis policy sets out the International Federation and member National Societies position onadvancing health security through safe and sustainable blood systems.Importance of blood servicesSustainable and quality blood services play a critical role in the health of any society, and in terms ofdisaster preparedness the existence of a quality blood service is critical. While the availability ofblood could be a major concern in the event of a disaster, the safety is also always of paramountconcern to any emergency/disaster response. Blood is used for a multitude of life saving purposesincluding: assisting patients undergoing surgery; treating diseases including anaemia and malaria;caring for patients on chemotherapy; supporting women with complications during childbirth(postpartum haemorrhage) and patients on Antiretroviral (ARV) treatments. The unavailability of safeblood can lead to serious health consequences such as death from haemorrhage or thetransmission of life threatening infections HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and C, syphilis and other infections.There should be preparedness plans to provide rapid response to emergency situations and forpost-disaster reconstruction of blood transfusion services.The availability of safe blood contributes directly to three of the United Nations MillenniumDevelopment Goals:4. the reduction of child mortality;5. the improvement of maternal health; and1Health Policy adopted at the 15 session of the General Assembly of the IFRC, Seoul, November 2005.Strategy 2020, p 15, IFRC3Blood Safety, Aide-Memoire for National Blood programme, WHO, 200226. combating HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases.It is recognised that a sufficient supply of safe blood and blood components based on voluntary nonremunerated blood donation (VNRBD), and the security of that supply, are important national goalsto prevent blood shortages and meet the transfusion needs of the patient population4.VNRBD is a critical component in ensuring a safe and sustainable blood supply that meets theneeds of all recipients. VNRBD was enshrined as a fundamental principle of blood service when the1975 World Health Assembly (WHA) resolution called for member states to promote thedevelopment of national blood services based upon voluntary non-remunerated donation of blood5.Patients must have equitable access to safe transfusion on the basis of their clinical needs, and thesafety of the donor and patient must be considered paramount. The International Federation and itsmember National Societies promote equity, access, quality and safety of blood and bloodcomponents so that citizens can have confidence in the security and integrity of their blood system.While the benefits of blood transfusion are widely acknowledged, there are also some risks inherentin the blood transfusion process, including accidental exposure to transfusion transmitted infectionssuch as HIV. To secure the safety of the blood supply, blood services must ensure that appropriatedonor screening and quality management processes are in place, and that they remain vigilantagainst new threats to the blood supply.Characteristics of well-functioning RC/RC blood programmesWhile it is the responsibility of a countrys government to ensure an adequate and safe blood supply,many National Societies play an important role in supporting their government to achieve thatobjective. National Societies may be involved in blood-related activities at three levels:A: Full blood services (collecting, testing, processing, distribution)B: Systematic recruitment of blood donors to a blood serviceC: Promotion and advocacy of blood donationThese levels are reflected in the figure below.Figure 1:Red Cross/Red Crescent role in blood activitiesblood service delivery,donor re-motivation viaexcellent donor serviceFULL BLOOD SERVICE (INCLUDING BLOOD COLLECTION)Level AStrategic campaigns,accessibility of blood centresRECRUITMENTLevel Bimpact of broad based communityeducation/awareness programmesMOTIVATION AND ADVOCACYLevel C45WHA resolution 63.12.WHA resolution 28.72 This principle was reasserted again by the WHA in 2005 (WHA58.13) and 2010 (WHA28.72)Each level of National Society involvement in blood services is characterised by differentrequirements regarding capacity and risk management. While Level A requires the most resourcesand has the highest level of risk, a well run National Society blood service can contribute enormouslyto the health and well-being of the community in which it is based. However, all National Societiescan contribute towards the development of a safe and sustainable blood system through theadvocacy and promotion of VNRBD.For a full description of the characteristics of each level, please refer to the Global Advisory Panel onCorporate Governance and Risk Management of Blood Services in Red Cross and Red CrescentSocieties (GAP) blood manual Development of Safe and Sustainable Blood Programmes. Asummary of the main characteristics of a well-functioning level A or B blood programme is providedbelow.For both Levels A and B: Systems are in place to ensure that the health and well-being of the donor and recipient areprotected There is national blood policy in place which reflects WHO recommendations, includingVNRBD, and it is supported by a legislative framework The blood programme is integrated as part of a national health policy and plan The allocation of roles and responsibilities between the Government , the blood programme,and the National Society reflect the overall responsibility of the Government to ensure anadequate and safe blood supply and are formally documented in a service agreement Long-term and sustainable funding allows the blood programme to:o meet operational and regulatory requirements with regards to facilities, supplies,equipment and trained staff and volunteers; ando implement appropriate donor care and risk management systems leading to high quality,safe and effective blood products. The blood programme is nationally coordinated to ensure uniformity of standards and costefficiency Donor selection criteria are in place to identify low risk donors and counselling is provided incases of deferral There is a risk management framework in place, to identify, prioritise and manage risksAt Level A: The National Society has secured government protection/indemnity and/or insurance cover forits blood service activities, including clinical advice. The National Society should assure that adequate external assessments are conductedregularly to ensure that the Blood services operate under the necessary quality assuranceprogramme and adheres to a national regulatory framework based upon internationallyrecognised standards. The blood service is involved in collaborations and partnerships to ensure a safe and adequateblood supply and appropriate product use.At Level B: The blood service to which the National Society recruits donors operates under a qualityassurance programme and adheres to a national regulatory framework based uponinternationally recognised standards.There are agreements in place whereby the roles and responsibilities of the National Societiesand the Blood Service are clearly defined.It is therefore important that National Societies consider carefully the level of blood activity which ismost appropriate for their engagement. The global burden of disease due to unsafe blood can beeliminated or substantially reduced through an integrated approach to blood safety, requiring,The establishment of a nationally coordinated blood serviceFormalization of government commitment and support.Contribute where appropriate to the Development of National blood policy and plans.Advocacy of necessary legislation/regulation for the Blood Transfusion Service .Establishment of nationwide quality systems, including guidelines, standard operatingprocedures, accurate records, monitoring and evaluation aligning to Government policy.Collection of blood only from vnrbd from low risk populationsHaemovigilance system for monitoring, reporting and investigating adverse events.Trained staff and continuing professional development and upgrading for latest technologyas a prerequisite.Ensure efficient and good laboratory practices in screening for transfusion transmissibleinfections, blood grouping, compatibility testing, blood component production, storage andtransportationReduction of unnecessary transfusions through effective clinical use of bloodBut a National Society needs to consider carefully all aspects of a sustainable and qualityprogramme, and if it is contemplating a commitment to undertake activities at Level A the NationalSociety:1. Should have a clear mandate from their government to do so;2. Should have the capacity to adhere to regulatory requirements and implement appropriateblood safety measures;3. is able to manage any legal liabilities, possibly by considering whether a separate legal entityis required to separate the assets of the National Society from the blood business.Independence with its own director, board of management and budget may also lead toincreased public trust and confidence, crucial to a successful national blood programme.Framework of support to RC/RC blood programmesTogether with WHO the IFRC is committed to the achievement of 100 per cent voluntary blooddonation, in keeping with our Fundamental Principles, and we have a long history of collaboration inthe area of blood safety and availability. The strength of the partnership lies in its complimentary andsynergistic approach at national as well as global level. Three key milestones have marked ourstrategic collaboration, each providing a global framework of support:(1) the designation of Blood Safety as the theme of WHOs World Health Day 7 April 2000,supported by IFRC(2) the foundation and establishment of World Blood Donor Day in 2004-5 which is nowcelebrated each year on 14 June to raise awareness of the importance of blood donationand recognize the contribution of voluntary non-remunerated blood donors in saving livesand improving health.(3) the 2009-10 release of the WHO/IFRC Global Framework for action-towards 100 per centvoluntary blood donationThe International Federations main toolkit, designed to assist key stakeholders in best practice, indonor recruitment and advocacy for 100 per cent vnrbd is the package Making aDifferencerecruiting voluntary, non-remunerated blood donors. This is a self-help manualempowering personnel in the field to motivate, recruit and retain vnrbd and to phase-out anydependence on family/replacement donors.National Societies and the International Federation have created an experts group (GAP) togenerally assist and advise National Societies on the governance and risk management issuesrelevant to blood services, as resources allow. GAPs main tool in working with National Societies isthe Self-assessment, a questionnaire that: enables National Societies to identify potential problem areas where their blood programmeactivities may be exposing them to risk; and offers strategies for improving corporate governance and risk management.Meanwhile, as ongoing support to sister societies and in accordance with the spirit of theInternational Federation, the sharing of best practice between National Societies is encouraged inorder to maintain and expand on the competitive advantage which the International Federation andits member National Societies have in this specialized field of health care.It is clearly acknowledged and understood that each National Society is fully responsible for its ownblood activities. The support provided by either the International Federation, GAP or assistingNational Societies does not in any way dilute or transmit this responsibility.Specific Responsibilities arising out of this policy:The International Federation, GAP and National Societies engage to:support and advocate the principle of voluntary, non-remunerated blood donation (VNRBD)advocate a balanced decision-making approach to blood safety that addresses both evidencebased considerations and the precautionary principlepromote and uphold high ethical standards, integrity and accountability consistent with theCode of Ethics for Blood Donation and Transfusion of the International Society of BloodTransfusion, as adopted by the International Conference of Red Cross and Red CrescentSocieties, 1981, and supported by the World Health OrganizationNational Societies have a responsibility to:work to ensure their Governments accept their responsibility to ensure a safe and adequate bloodsupply within their jurisdictionsidentify their role in the overall strategy of blood service delivery in their country in accordancewith their capacity, technical know-how, available resources, local priorities and in liaison withgovernmentpromote safe, sustainable and equitable practices in the development and administration ofblood programmesensure their blood programme has an adequate governance structure with a well-definedsystem for delegation of authority and accountability.support the aspiration of national self-sufficiency, including ensuring adequate blood and bloodproducts to meet domestic health needsundertake Humanitarian Diplomacy as necessary to seek government action to minimise risk inblood services and to help ensure that Government alerts the public to any reasonably preventableinadequacy in blood service delivery which places them at riskimplement the GAP Self-assessment and adhere to the Development of Safe and SustainableNational Blood Programmes Manual, which may necessitate a more detailed analysis,assessment and development of an exit strategyrespect the confidentiality and privacy of all information relating to blood donors and blooddonationadminister any blood programmes in compliance with this position; inform all staff, volunteersand blood sector partners participating in blood programmes of this positionwhere practical, provide support to other National Societies and blood services in achieving asafe and sustainable blood system in ways that enable self-empowerment and long-termsustainabilitytake steps in consultation with GAP and other partners to ensure that appropriate riskmanagement measures are implemented; this includes ensuring that its senior managementand governing leaders are alerted to any material risks and that appropriate action issubsequently takenensure that all blood programmes comply with this policyThe International Federation has a responsibility to:focus on the promotion of voluntary blood donor recruitment and to liaise and work in closecollaboration with GAP, WHO and other partners in implementating the WHO/IFRC GlobalFramework for action-towards 100 per cent voluntary blood donationshare knowledge and exchange information with GAP at a strategic, regional and countrylevel.ensure this policy is reviewed after five yearswork with the GAP membership to help ensure necessary GAP resourcingkeep through the International Federation Secretary General International FederationGovernance appropriately informed of major material risks for the International Federation itbecomes aware ofThe GAP has a responsibility to:share knowledge and provide advice to National Societies on governance and management ofrisk associated with blood programmes, as resources allowensure any lessons learned from the implementation of the GAP manual Development of Safeand Sustainable National Blood Programmes are incorporated into an update of the manual atsame time as the policy reviewinform both the International Federation Secretariat and the concerned National Societies of majormaterial risks for the International Federation discovered through the GAP National Society selfassessment program in blood service delivery and any other GAP workReview and Reference:This policy was drawn up in 2010 and it is designed to replace the previously established policy onQuality Provision in Blood Services. IFRC will ensure this policy is reviewed after five years, withany proposed amendments to be submitted to the Federation for approval. The review is to beinitiated no later than 30 Dec 2014.This policy is submitted to Governing Board Dec 2010 for its approval and submission to the GeneralAssembly in Nov 2011.Further Reference Texts:Decision 34, 8th session of the General Assembly, Budapest, 25-28 Nov 1991.Voluntary nonremunerated blood donors are persons who give blood, plasma or other blood components of theirown free will and receive no payment for it, either in the form of cash, or in kind which could beconsidered a substitute for money. This includes time off work, other than reasonably needed for thedonation and travel. Small tokens, refreshments and reimbursement of direct travel costs arecompatible with voluntary, non-remunerated donationCode of Ethics for Blood Donation and Transfusion. International Society of Blood Transfusion,General Assembly, Montreal, 1980 and XXIVth International Conference of the Red Cross, Manila,1981.Code of Ethics for Blood Donation and Transfusion. International Society of Blood Transfusion,General Assembly, 12 July 2000; amended by the ISBT General Assembly, 5 September 2006.Decision 36, Blood Quality Programme. Seville, Spain: 11th Session of the General Assembly,November 1997.Melbourne Declaration 2009, arising from WHO/IFRC global consultation on 100 per cent vnrbdwhereby participants (more than 65 experts in transfusion medicine, policy makers, government andnon-government representatives from 38 countries across WHO/IFRC regions) agreed, inter alia, towork in collaboration in international efforts to promote safe and sustainable vnrbd programmes thatfoster community engagement and benefit the recipients of blood and blood products.Decision, World Health Assembly, 2010, Availability, safety and quality of blood products(WHA63:12)

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